genomics & society

Trainees

Cheryl Brewer, R.N., MSN is a PhD student in the Department of Nursing. She received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from North Carolina Central University and a Master of Science Degree in Nursing Administration from Duke University.  Her research interest areas are in prenatal and newborn screening in African Americans. Cheryl is also pursuing certification in Health Disparities through the UNC School of Public Health. She is presently working with Dr. Marcia Van Riper in the UNC school of Nursing and the UNC Center for Genome Sciences examining how families define and manage ethical issues that emerge during genetic testing for prenatal screening for Down Syndrome and BRCA 1 & 2 testing for breast cancer.

Katie Byerly, is an undergraduate Anthropology and Public Health Policy and Management double major at UNC Chapel Hill. Her interests include community health initiatives and the incorporation of cultural awareness in health programs. She is currently working with Lynn Dressler on an ELSI case study identifying common ELSI issues in genetic research and how these past examples can be used to inform policy development for future projects.

Crissy Dodson, R.N., MSN is a Ph. D. student in the Department of Nursing. She received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a Master of Science Degree in Nursing Education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  Her research interest areas are in the area of pharmacogenomics primarily related to oncology. She is presently working with Dr. Marcia Van Riper in the UNC School of Nursing and the UNC Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy.

Astrid Ertola, M.A. received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Master of Arts in Psychology from the City University of New York, Queens College. She is currently a doctoral student in Clinical Psychology at Fielding Graduate University (APA Accredited) and works as an IRB coordinator with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her professional interests include research ethics, in particular obtaining consent from vulnerable populations. Her current ELSI-related dissertation research explores issues surrounding obtaining consent in individuals with diminished decisional capacity.

Wendell Fortson, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral trainee in the Center for Genomics and Society. He received his B.S. in Biology from Tennessee State University in 2001 and attained his Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences (Cancer Biology) from Morehouse School of Medicine in 2009. His dissertation research focused on therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer based on the function of ERG (ets -related gene). He works with John Conley, Ph.D., J.D. and Arlene Davis, J.D. to investigate the emerging ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) relating to long-term storage of human specimen for genetic research. Wendell is currently a J.D. candidate at North Carolina Central University School of Law-Evening Program. With the patients’ best interest always at the forefront, Wendell endeavors to unite his scientific and legal knowledge to help influence policies that will advance biomedical research and improve the healthcare system on the state and federal levels.

Rachel Haase is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill. She received a BA in Anthropology from the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, Canada, and an MA in Social Anthropology from Dalhousie University, in Nova Scotia. Her research interests include mental health, psychiatric genetics, devolution and privatization, and understandings of responsibility in the context of health and health care. She is currently working for Debra Skinner on a project investigating participants’ experiences of whole-genome analysis studies in high-risk cancer families.

Martha King is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill. She received her BA in Archaeology and History from Furman University in 2000 and received her MA in Folklore from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2006. Her past research explored identity and representation among community-based expressive culture traditions in Western North Carolina. Her current ELSI-related dissertation research explores the relationship between the Amish settlement around Lancaster, PA and a genetic research and treatment facility serving that community. This research focuses on potential fields of contention, cooperation, and negotiation between the Amish patient population and biomedical practitioners.

Dragana Lassiter is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research interests include the institutionalization of bioethics in Serbia as it relates to biobanking, the relationship between bioethics and modernity, and ethics and materiality. 

Marsha Michie  is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the UNC Center for Genomics and Society. She is a cultural anthropologist who conducts ethnographic and qualitative research on the ways that patients and families deal with genetic disorders; the ways that research participants make meaning out of genetic information; and moral and religious perspectives on genomics research and
new technologies. She currently works with several CGS faculty on projects related to whole genome sequencing research, genetic biobanking, and families of children with an inherited developmental disability.

 

Sondra Smolek is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at UNC-Chapel Hill, where she received her MA in Sociology in 2005. She received a BA in Sociology and Anthropology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Her past research has explored connections between culture and family dynamics, particularly with regard to conflicts between adolescents and parents, using data from the National Study of Youth and Religion. Other work has included research with Andrew Perrin using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine adolescents’ trust in government before and after 9/11. Her current ELSI-related research interests include parenting strategies and resources of families with children who have genetic conditions and, more broadly, the implications of genetic diagnoses for family life.

Karey Sutton, PhD, is a post doctoral trainee with the Center for Genomics and Society. She completed a B.A. in Classical Civilization and B.S. in Chemistry at Howard University (2004) and a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (2010). While at Virginia Tech, Karey was awarded the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (F31) by the National Human Genome Research Institute. Her dissertation research focused on understanding the views of African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos concerning genetic research and genetic testing. Other research areas of interest are how genomic information affects members of minority communities, issues related to the involvement of minorities in genetic research, genomics policy development, and strategies to effectively engage the African American community.

2 Responses to “Trainees”

  1. […] & society a virtual source of information about genomics and society HomeAboutContributorsReferences ← Whole Exome Sequencing: The […]

  2. […] & society a virtual source of information about genomics and society HomeAboutContributorsReferences ← CGS Seminar: “Gifts of the Body: Expectations of Cancer Patients […]

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